FAQ#1. Can you ship/deliver my order?

FAQ#2. What means “reconditioned” on your products? Is it the same as refurbished?

FAQ#3. What is the difference between a laptop, notebook, netbook, chromebook, macbook, subnotebook, ultraportable, convertible, mobile workstation and ultrabook?

FAQ#4. Business-grade vs consumer-grade computers

FAQ#5. Inkjet or laser printer?

FAQ#6. What’s “TurboBoost” and that “up to” speed for processors?

FAQ#7. Battery life and battery wear level

FAQ#8. What is the difference between a genuine and a generic battery/adapter?

FAQ#9. The battery I got from you/the battery in the laptop I got from you won’t work.

FAQ#10. I want to buy a new computer but don’t know where to start – please help!

FAQ#11. “I know nothing about computers, I trust your judgment, just choose for me”

FAQ#12. What computer brand is the best?

FAQ#13. Operating system and apps included on our systems

FAQ#14. Do your computers/printers/monitors come with cables?

FAQ#15. Can I run Android apps on a chromebook?

FAQ#16. I sent an e-transfer half an hour ago, the funds are out of my account, and you still haven’t received it. What is going on?

FAQ#17. Is there a password on the products you sell?

FAQ#18. I am buying a desktop computer from you. What adapters/peripherals do I need?

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FAQ#1. Can you ship/deliver my order?

Orders placed on our website are intended for pick up from our location in Airdrie, AB, free of charge. We are able to offer courier delivery in Calgary area, cost depends on your location, urgency and what you want delivered as well (i.e. bulkiness/heaviness of the order is a factor). Free delivery is available for most orders $150+ in Calgary area once a week. Warehouse deals are not eligible to free delivery. We are also able to ship smaller items using Canada Post, country-wide at Canada Post rates + 12% handling charge. If you wish to use your own carrier, for parcels picked up at our location by your carrier, we only charge a $5 processing fee for orders under 10lbs, and $9 for orders 10lbs or more. If you need us to bring the parcel to your carrier in town, we will process a $8 handling fee for orders under 10lbs, and $12 fee for orders 10lbs and more. Applicable taxes are required to be paid as well. Shipping charges are non-negotiable.

Unless otherwise specified, we are not able to ship large items except by courier delivery, and we are also not shipping any order outside of Canada at this point.

Just contact us for a quote prior to placing an order. Order cancellation request after payment on the base of customer unable to pick up or pay shipping fee will be processed for store credit only, as per our Terms and Conditions. No show at the time of delivery is subject to second delivery attempt fee. We reserve the right to process a 20% administrative fee on any cancellation.

FAQ#2. What means “reconditioned” on your products? Is it the same as refurbished?

“Refurbished” is an industry-broad word that can mean a large number of things, from “used” to “put back in brand-new condition. We feel it is not fair to leave that vague term potentially fool customers. We decided to use instead the word “reconditioned”, which doesn’t suggest “manufacturer refurbished and put back in brand-new condition” but instead explains that as a reconditioner/refurbisher and reseller, we cleaned, repaired the product and upgraded it as required, made sure it is in plug and play condition (unless otherwise stated) and used all our expertise to get it in as good or better operating condition than new (i.e. for computers, we make sure to remove any bloatware normally included by manufacturers, etc.).

In the case of products we don’t have an in-house expert for (especially networking devices, smart watches as well as some exotic products), we only ensure the products do power on properly. Those products are typically sold much below their fair market value as a result, so as long as you don’t mind potentially have to do some work on those devices to get them in the operating condition you require, then enjoy the bonus savings!

FAQ#3. What is the difference between a laptop, notebook, netbook, chromebook, macbook, subnotebook, ultraportable, convertible, mobile workstation and ultrabook?

Laptop and notebook are synonyms and designate all types of portable computers.

A chromebook is a laptop running ChromeOS in opposition of Windows or MacOS. A macbook is a laptop running MacOS. The large majority of laptops run Windows and can be called Windows laptops but are usually simply referred to as laptops. Most chromebooks are designed for students use, however there are some higher end models that are gaming capable or even designed for business use.

A netbook is a small, lightweight and inexpensive laptop computer, running entry-level processors. They were first introduced in 2007 and have been replaced by chromebooks and entry-level ultrabooks. Netbooks are the slowest type of laptops, and also the most affordable ones. They were designed for classroom use (at the time) and casual use. They would be considered slow to very slow to today’s standards and are not able to do gaming, video watching or multitasking.

A subnotebook is a slightly smaller type of laptop, i.e. with a 12in or 13in screen. Their equipment is usually very similar to identical to similar 14in/15in laptops. An ultraportable laptop goes one step further with smaller screen (11in-12in) and are significantly lighter. Ultrabooks (first introduced in 2011) go another step further, with a slimmer body (<0.8in height) and LV or ULV processors for better battery life.

A convertible laptop, 2-in-1, or tablet PC is a touchscreen laptop that turns into a tablet (folding partially to completely), either with a stylus or not. The three big downsides of these, are #1 the customer pays a significant premium for the convertible feature, #2 similarly to tablets, they are very limited when it comes to upgrading them, and #3 they are usually much more expensive than regular laptops to repair.

A mobile workstation is a heavy-duty laptop, that is intended to be running in rough conditions and packs more powerful components than regular laptops and use business-class dedicated graphics such as NVIDIA Quadro or AMD FirePro. They are usually bulky and heavy. Their cousins gaming laptops usually use similar components, but lack the sturdiness of mobile workstations, while using consumer-class dedicated graphics such as GeForce or Radeon.

FAQ#4 Business-grade vs consumer-grade computers

In short – consumer-grade computers are designed to be eye-catching (using appealing design, glossy screens, etc.) and offering appealing features (such as large hard drive or high amount of ram) while usually cheaper components in order to be offered at a competitive price in stores. Durability is not a key focus on these laptops. Business-grade computers are generally built sturdy, both inside and out, with balanced components (i.e. good processor and good ram in order to avoid a bottleneck) and are generally much more expensive than consumer-grade computers when buying new. Consumer-grade laptops also come with loads of bloatware when you buy them new. When servicing or refurbishing them, we make sure to do a clean install without that bloatware. It is also typically easier to find parts for business-grade computers compared to consumer-grade ones, hence it is cheaper to fix them. We sell both types and the question you need to ask yourself basically is: do you want cheap or do you want durable? There is no wrong answer 🙂

Next step is military-grade computers, that are even sturdier than business-grade laptops, but are also much more expensive. We rarely get these in due to their high cost that cannot be justified for 98% of users.

FAQ#5. Inkjet or laser printer?

Inkjet is cheaper to buy, more expensive to maintain. Ink dries out over time. They do the trick for casual users (but not too casual, for the reason mentioned above). Laser has a higher initial cost but if you print very little, or very much, they end up being cheaper. They usually are also much sturdier and should last you much longer. In short – laser printers are far more superior than inkjet models.

FAQ#6. What’s “TurboBoost” and that “up to” speed for processors?

Modern processors have the ability to switch automatically from a base speed to a maximum speed, called “TurboBoost”. It’s an especially desirable feature on laptops as you want your laptop to operate at the lowest speed possible on basic use in order to save energy and battery life, and at the highest speed on TurboBoost. A good laptop processor would operate under 2GHz on base speed and over 2.5GHz on TurboBoost, and a very good one would go over 3GHz. Titles of our listings reflect that “up to” speed and detailed specifications show that complete information.

FAQ#7. Battery life and battery wear level

As much as possible, we try to provide accurate information regarding the batteries on our used laptops. It is however impossible for us to tell you how long your battery runtime will be as it depends on many factors that can affect it significantly, such settings, usage, apps running in the background, load, ambient temperature and other factors, i.e. on the very same machine, 2 different users can get 3-4 hours of runtime for one and only half an hour for the other one. These fine prints are also present when you buy a brand-new laptop from the manufacturer or a big box store as it’s the nature of batteries. As often as possible, we try to provide the battery wear level as gathered by Nirsoft’s BatteryInfoView (in short, 85 to 100% is good to great, 75-85% is average, 60-75% is low and below 60% is close to end of life) and the battery runtime as estimated by Windows and/or Nirsoft’s tool if we had the opportunity to test it that far. For actual battery runtime scenarios, we recommend to use notebookcheck.com, a great resource for in-depth reviews including battery runtime in different scenarios. Use the percentage of battery life left as listed on our website with the numbers on notebookcheck.com, and you’ll get a decent (albeit non-contractual, for the reasons mentioned above) estimation of battery runtime on any specific model.
Batteries in laptops having a health of 75% or below using Nirsoft’s BatteryInfoView will be listed as “may need to be replaced soon” and a $20 discount will be applied on a compatible battery purchase during the warranty length of your purchase.

FAQ#8. What is the difference between a genuine and a generic battery/adapter?

Genuine (also called OEM) adapters/chargers and batteries are approved by the OEM (laptop/tablet/etc. manufacturer) and they warranty it for at least a year. Generic or “compatible” adapters have no obligation of any kind, and there are some really bad quality ones out there. The generic models we sell come from our trusted supplier and we have had no noticeable issue with them in over 10 years of running business. Although they are sometimes a bit more expensive than the cheapest ones you can find online – we know they are good quality models, and also come with warranty. They also remain quite cheaper than genuine ones.

Bad quality generic adapters and batteries can be as bad as killing a motherboard so we highly recommend to use caution when considering a noname/generic/aftermarket/compatible adapter or battery. None of them guarantees your own equipment if they fail – the warranty (if there’s any) only covers the adapter or battery itself. Universal models fall into this category as well.

Now regarding quality generic adapters and batteries, they usually don’t last as long as genuine ones (which includes the runtime of a battery) but the cost savings may be worth it. Some battery models use even better quality cells (i.e. Dr Battery models) which makes them half way between a standard generic, and a genuine, in terms of battery runtime.

At the end of the day, it comes down to a customer’s preference to use a good quality generic, or a genuine one. Just say no to low-end generic ones!

FAQ#9. The battery I got from you/the battery in the laptop I got from you won’t work.

A new battery or a battery in deep sleep (battery unused for weeks or more) needs to be initialized. In most cases, just leaving the laptop plugged in for 2 to 4 hours does the trick, then it is good practice to do 3 full cycles (all the way to 100% then all the way down to 0%, 3 times in a row) to get the best out of your battery. In a few cases, we’ve seen batteries taking 7-12 hours to “wake up”. Just leave your laptop plugged in overnight or more if necessary. If your battery doesn’t wake up after that, you have to physically “tell” your laptop to initialize it. To do so, turn off your laptop normally, remove power adapter and battery, then hold the power button down for 30 seconds. Then plug the laptop into the power adapter and power on the laptop without the battery installed. Let the system start up then shut it down. Install the battery and leave the computer off for a couple hours, then power it on. If it still doesn’t work, contact us and we will test your battery and try to initialize it, and replace it if needed, as in some cases, a battery in deep sleep may simply fail to initialize (this is especially true – but not exclusive – to previously used batteries).

In the case of an internal battery, there will be a tiny hole on the side or bottom of the laptop with a battery logo next to it, simply use a paperclip to reset the battery instead of physically taking the battery out and back in.

All the laptops we sell with a new battery are tested to take a charge on that battery. We do not complete a full charging cycle previously from sale as leaving a laptop off for days or weeks after that could simply leave the battery in deep sleep (see above). When you purchase a laptop from us, we will initialize the battery for you at no charge should you give us sufficient time (as mentioned above, it can take up to 24 hours, however 2-4 hours are usually enough) between purchase time and pick up time. If you choose to pick up your laptop shortly after making your purchase (or on the spot!) then obviously, the steps above have to be completed by the customer to initialize the battery. Some models (i.e. ThinkPads) have an integrated chip that prevents the battery to charge over 80%, effectively reducing day to day battery life in order to preserve the battery’s entire lifetime. That feature can typically be disabled either in the BIOS, in Windows power options or through manufacturer-provided software like ThinkVantage, although sometimes it is part of the system and cannot be deactivated.

FAQ#10. I want to buy a new computer but don’t know where to start – please help!

No worries, that’s what we do, and unlike some stores, we won’t try to sell you the most expensive computer out there, but rather something that fits your needs best.

So here’s a number of questions you can use as a template and send us with your answers so we can make suggestions based on your need, sorted by the most selective to the least one.

If you’re looking for a laptop:

1. what screen size you want (ranges from 10in to 17in)?

2. what will it be used for (i.e. web browsing, watching movies, playing games and if so – name a few of them as requirements vary A LOT based on that)?

3. what operating system you need (i.e. Windows 10, Windows XP, ChromeOS, MacOS,…)?

4. what’s your budget?

5. is portability (thickness and weight – laptops range 2lbs to 9lbs) a concern?

6. how much storage you need or what will you use storage for (i.e. frequent smartphone backups, installing AAA games, storage videos,… are big factors for that)?

7. what performance level you expect (i.e. will define how much ram, what processor you need as well as if you want a hard drive or a SSD)?

8. want/need Bluetooth? Backlit keyboard/ Full-size keyboard (with number pad)? Webcam? Lid color preference? Screen resolution?

9. outputs – need a digital video output (i.e. HDMI or DP)? Number of USB ports? Serial port? Other ports you need?

If you’re looking for a desktop:

1. what will it be used for (i.e. web browsing, watching movies, playing games and if so – name a few of them as requirements vary A LOT based on that)?

2. what operating system you need (i.e. Windows 10, Windows XP, MacOS,…)?

3. what’s your budget?

4. is size a concern (i.e. tower or small form factor, booksize, all-in-one, etc.)?

5. how much storage you need or what will you use storage for (i.e. frequent smartphone backups, installing AAA games, storage videos,… are big factors for that)?

6. what performance level you expect (i.e. will define how much ram, what processor you need as well as if you want a hard drive or a SSD)?

7. want/need Bluetooth? wifi?

8. outputs – need a digital video output (i.e. HDMI or DP)? Number of USB ports? Serial port? Other ports you need?

If you’re looking for a monitor:

1. what device will you connect it to (i.e. security system DVRs can be quite picky when it comes to supported resolutions, gaming consoles also have such limitations)?

2. what output(s) has your device? That will identify what inputs your monitors needs or what cables/adapters you will need to connect them together. The monitor’s inputs have little impact on what you need. You mostly need to identify if you require an analog (VGA) or digital (HDMI, DP, DVI, etc.) signal, then get the proper cable.

3. what screen size do you want (typically ranges from 15in to 30in)? Do you need a stand and if so what type (i.e. height adjustable and being able to pivot)?

4. what screen quality would you like (i.e. TN panels have slightly better responsiveness for fast-paced gaming, while IPS and PLS panels have and deeper blacks, better colour rendering and better viewing angles. The less common VA panels are similar to IPS but with better contract and weaker viewing angle)?

5. what’s your budget?

FAQ#11. “I know nothing about computers, I trust your judgment, just choose for me”

Understanding how a computer works sure isn’t mandatory in order to buy one. Just like you don’t need to be mechanically inclined to buy a car. However when you buy a car, you know how many seats you want, possibly the kind of engine, and of course the type of vehicle you want. There are brands you like and some you don’t, and some features you absolutely want, while some you don’t. The same applies when buying a computer. Computers are not one size fits all, even on an unlimited budget (which very few people have anyway). We are happy to assist you and make recommendations based on your specific requirements, and provide advice as well as required. We have a very thorough expertise in that field and are happy to use it to assist you. But we do not choose a model for you. Can you go to a big box store and have an employee tell you what to buy? Absolutely. And if that’s the kind of service you want, we are just fine with not getting your business, as this is not the kind of experience we want to provide our customers. Keep in mind that somebody telling you to buy a specific model without understanding your requirements, means they will either choose a model for you randomly – or whichever model they get the best commission on – or even worse, they have no more computer knowledge than you, and will pick a model that “looks right” without understanding its potential flaws. And either way – they don’t have to care too much as if any issue arises – they won’t be the one dealing with you after they’re closed the sale.
Again – we don’t do that. Why is that? First, we care about how customers getting what they need. Second, we are a small business – when a customer is unhappy with their purchase, the employee that made the sale, is the one that will be dealing with that customer. These are two very good reasons for us to not “choose for you”.

FAQ#12. What computer brand is the best?

There is no definitive answer to this question. It mostly comes to a personal preference, as almost all brands have great products, middle of the road products, and entry-level ones. Moreover, almost all brands only design their products, and have them built by third-party manufacturers such as Foxconn, Quanta, Compal, Pegatron, etc. In the same lineup of a brand, you may have 3 different manufacturers for each one of the parts, and when you buy two seemingly identical models – they may not be from the same manufacturer, and they may variate greatly in terms of quality and reliability.
Long story short, the quality of a product is often reflected by its price, and specifically, the prices we list the products we sell for, are reflective of the performance, condition and specification of each specific model. In instance, business-grade models won’t be as pretty as consumer-grade ones, but are built sturdier.
The website Engadget publishes a handy annual breakdown of the best and worst laptop brands, based on online reviews, value, quality of support, as well as their own appreciation, and even if it doesn’t depict a complete picture of each brand (i.e. buying a model of the “best brand” doesn’t mean the specific model you are purchasing is good for your specific case use), it is a good starting point to assess a brand quality.

FAQ#13. Operating system and apps included on our systems

All the system we sell use a legitimate, legal to use, operating system license. The systems we sell also include LibreOffice productivity suite (or Google Docs on a chromebook), Google Chrome web browser, Skype, Acrobat Reader, MPC or VLC media player, fully licensed antivirus and firewall with no expiry – and no bloatware.
Why do we use LibreOffice because of MSOffice? Simply because LibreOffice is free to use, fully compatible with all 4 main components of MSOffice (Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access), and over 98% of our buyers since we started business in 2011 have enjoyed that switch, while MSOffice license is quite expensive. Some other sellers include illegal versions of MSOffice (i.e. Office 2016 Pro Plus or a cracked Office 2019). We don’t deal with illegal software. We do sell legit Microsoft Office licenses too if you prefer it over LibreOffice or other free alternative like OpenOffice, FreeOffice or Google Docs, as well as MSOffice365 online. Microsoft also usually provides MSOffice for free for 1 month on new accounts on Windows 10 and 11 computers.

FAQ#14. Do your computers/printers/monitors come with cables?

Yes of course, all our new, reconditioned and refurbished items come with power cord/adapter unless otherwise stated.

Printers and monitors also come with one connection cable, either USB or ethernet for printers, and VGA or DVI for monitors. You’re welcome to let us know which one you prefer, otherwise we will randomly pick one for you. In general, analog only monitors will come with a VGA cable – and digital monitors will come with a DVI or VGA cable. If you pick a monitor without a DVI input (and instead a DP or HDMI one), you will need a sold separately adapter to connect to DVI, or you may request for a VGA cable instead. If you’re not sure what you need, just ask us!

We also provide a free USB cable for monitors with an integrated USB hub, and a free audio cable for monitors with analog speakers. Other cables/adapters (i.e. DP, HDMI, uDP, etc.) can be purchased separately.

The only exception is warehouse deals – they come without any cable or adapter of any sort.

FAQ#15. Can I run Android apps on a chromebook?

In short: maybe, but most likely not. Chromebooks run ChromeOS, while Android is the OS used in a number of tablets and phones. These are two different operating systems, that don’t have access to the same apps catalog. Google (owner of both Android and ChromeOS) have however started to grant access to the Android catalog to some of the chromebooks – so far (April 2021), about 25% of them only have access to it, most (but not all) being newer chromebooks. If you are not sure, you can just look up the list on Google website, or just ask us!

FAQ#16. I sent an e-transfer half an hour ago, the funds are out of my account, and you still haven’t received it. What is going on?

Your bank may hold on to your funds for any reason, i.e. suspicion of abnormal activity, verification of availability of funds, etc. In any case, they notify you either by email or text (depending what option you’ve set up) once you have sent the funds, and again once the funds have been released. It may take 2 minutes, an hour, or more. Many online banking users also have a hold set on funds of a certain amount (often $200 or $250 but it differs for everyone) for an hour or two, and don’t realize it. That’s a security feature banks offer to allow customers to revert an e-transfer should they’ve made a mistake – or been hacked. Again, once the funds are released to us, you get a notification from your bank, and one from us as well. Until these funds reach us (and even after), we have no visibility on why your bank is holding on to the funds and the best way is to contact us to inquire about the reason, and ask them to released them quicker if you want to. We release an order once we have received a payment in full.

FAQ#17. Is there a password on the products you sell?

By default, we don’t set a password on the computers/phones/etc. we sell, unless forced by the OS (i.e. some Apple products). In that case, the default password is either 1234 or 123456. You can of course change that password, and regardless if there is one or not, you can set up the password you like, if you want one.

FAQ#18. I am buying a desktop computer from you. What adapters/peripherals do I need?

All our desktop computers come with a power cable. To use your computer, you will need a mouse, keyboard (or equivalent), speakers, and a network connection if you want to access your network and/or the internet.

– Monitors: we have a wide range of monitors in stock, and we’ll always make sure to match whatever cable/adapter you require to connect your computer or monitor together. If you’re not getting a monitor from us, it is assumed you have the right cables already (connections are indicated on each listing), but if you require assistance confirming it/getting the right cable/adapter, just let us know 🙂

– Mouse and keyboard: all our desktop computers $150+ come with included bin mouse and keyboard upon request. Models under that amount can have those peripherals purchased separately. Bin peripherals will be basic models, may have faded keys and/or be dirty, or we also offers a wide range of models for sale as well.

– Speakers: in general, business-grade desktops come with an integrated speaker (keep in mind though that it is typically low quality and not designed for gaming/playing movies and music, etc.), while consumer-grade don’t. It’s a general rule with exceptions, some feel free to ask us if you want to confirm it. We also offer a wide range of desktop speakers, regardless of what model you are getting.

– Network connection: unless otherwise stated, all desktop computers come with an ethernet connection as sole network connection. You will require a network cable to connect it to your network (usually provided with your router, or we sell those as well). WiFi is becoming more common on desktop computers, but is still not the norm. Models coming with a WiFi adapter will be indicated as such, or if you need a wireless adapter, you can buy one off our website, or let us know if you need assistance choosing one. Bluetooth is very rarely included on desktop computers yet, and can also be purchased off our website if you require one.

Do you see any information that you feel should be added in here? please let us know! 🙂